Since the release of Talk, Nigerians have been on the edge of their seats in anticipation of Moral Instruction, the album of choice and the jolt of energy we as Nigerians need in furtive times like these. Keying into a number of vices that govern our society today, Falz unleashed a stream of consciousness on Talk and now serves listeners with more than expected on a 9-track cumbersome overflow of political and religious subjects, introspection, the quirks of the digital age and a slew of left-wing ideas which he serves in raw honesty that collide with real-life storytelling in form of witty punchlines and polished bars.

As Falz, snakes through this maze of penitent subjects in Moral Instruction, unfolding his thoughts over sublime production and nostalgic but awakening samples, taking life from resounding soundscapes, some influenced by original sounds, others digitalized and some a mesh of both, it becomes clear that the objects of his abhorrence are not the ills of our society but the people behind them.

Moral Instruction is not only dynamic, but thought-provokingly symbolic. It’s no wonder Falz is held in high reverence by Nigerians who view him as the rising Messiah of music and have now upped his accolades by comparing him to Fela Anikulapo-Kuti, who in all honesty, shares a number of similarities with the Former.